Powering Lights?

Discussion in 'Lights and Equipment' started by DaRkxFaDeD, Jun 10, 2009.

  1. DaRkxFaDeD Junior Stoner

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    Well i just got some fluorescent lights and while i was setting them up i noticed theres not a normal plug to get power. Does anyone know a way how to somehow convert this plug to a standard electric plug?
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  2. CannabisCicada Junior Stoner

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    the plug is made so you can insert wires into those holes. It needs to be romex wire the cind they use to wire your house. you can cut it off and use wire nuts to screw onto a cord you cut the female end off of or buy a blank cord from home depot and make as long as you need. I have done this many times in the past when lighting up a work space.As for the yellow thing i dont know what that is the pic is too blury. Good luck;bonghit
  3. DaRkxFaDeD Junior Stoner

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    Thanks for the reply (srry for late reply didn't have internet for a bit.) I used a cord like this with 2 prongs
    [IMG]

    But how do i know which 2 wires on the 2 prong cord and the cfl cord is positive and negative?

    The wire on the cfl is also solid copper and not all loose copper that you have to twist to stay as one, Will a wire nut work with the solid copper or should i soldier them together?
  4. mazarxnl Ron Paul 2012

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    usually if you strip the end of the plug in wire, you'll see that each wire is wrapped in a plastic coating. The red coated wire is the positive one.
  5. XBPete Apprentice

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    Follow the wide plug end, it is the neutral or white wire in your socket ( assuming your socket is wired correctly ) the narrow part of the plug is the hot side and will connect to the black or red lead . Usually there is writing or ribs that you can follow from the socket to the cut end of the wire to make it easier...

    Strip the wire covering off back 1/2 inch from the cut end. Be careful when stripping to not cut the wires, a cheap wire stripper is a valuable little tool in the grow room if you are a DIY person,

    If the wire is multiple strand copper, twirl it between two fingers to braid it together. Do the same to the device leads, again if multiple strand. Be careful when stripping to not cut the wires, a cheap wire stripper is a valuable little tool in the grow room if you are a DIY person. Then twist or twirl the two ends together, black to black and neutral to white.

    Be sure to wire nut ( prolly orange or yellow ) and twist is on clockwise until the wires start to braid three times, then tape the connection around where the nut and wires come together to seal out dust and moisture from the connection.

    I think the picture shows a hard wire connector, this allows plug in wires from house wiring and is not made for plugs,,,, but the pic is fuzzy so I would cut it off and wire using the method above.. the yellow is probably a ground or could be for series wiring for multiple lights... but I would have to see the light or know the type and maker..

    Yeah, I know it is an old post but good information doesn't age, it gets passed..

    Peace,

    Pete ( an electrician...);fishing

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