Molasses.

Discussion in 'Soil & Organic Cultivation' started by Leetginger, Sep 16, 2008.

  1. Leetginger Junior Stoner

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    Just thought I would post a link to some great information about molasses and what it REALLY does for marijuana.

    After reading through the entire article it is clear that molasses is extremely beneficial for your plants, hopefully this will clear the air.

    The 3LB’s Molasses Manual - A Marijuana Growers Guide To Soil Sweeteners

    its pretty long and in-depth but you get the point, use more molasses.
  2. Osprey Solid.

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    Ha! Mole Asses! I'm real sorry, I didn't have anything relevant to add. I just always get a laugh when I hear or see Molasses. . .
  3. Leetginger Junior Stoner

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    lol, i totally missed that and now I am going to think of that everytime I hear or say that word. GREAT!
  4. dez Junior Stoner

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    i use it with every other watering...great stuff! much info on it at icmag...
  5. Osprey Solid.

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    I did read the article, not in its entirety, just a bit long and esoteric. The info is solid though, I may look further into it.
  6. passionate_grower Experienced Stoner

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    Well, I read through the article, and it seemed to be more of a molasses promotion than a critical examination of the trade-offs in using sucrose/fructose compounds as soil ammendments for our favorite herb. So let me present, the rest of the story.

    The plant's energy to grow is based upon the natural metaboplic process, the Calvin-Benson Cycle [aka photosynthesis] using light, CO2, water and a host of minerals [not the least of which are N, P and K] to produce GP3 [triose phosphate] which it can then chemically rearrange into sugars and starches...its food.

    So if you consider the plant's metabolism, how it lives and thrives, it would seem that what we can do to best enhance its growth is to provide adequate light, CO2, water and minerals so that its internal GP3 factory is always at highest production. Make sense?

    Now consider adding its internal food [molasses....a sugar compound] to the soil. Somehow we are ignoring and bypassing the plant's own metabolic process. We are also hoping that the plant can somehow absorb and process this food through the roots, that are designed for cation exchange as well as water and O2 uptake.
    It is a very complex discussion to examine how "good" this might be for the plant in general. I would give it a 50/50 chance of being as beneficial as conventional fertilizing.

    Molasses as a chelating agent, sure, but marginal. You'd be much better off the ensure that your NPK fertilizer has those other 16 or so essential micro-nutrients.

    But here is the kicker, and is pointed out in the article. Molasses is certainly food for a wide array of microorganisms, in particular, fungi and bacteria. It only pointed out the "beneficial microorganisms". Now, I am sure what they speak about are the soil fungi family, mycorrhizae. And it is important to understand that they are only beneficial in that they establish a symbiotic relationship with the plant. The fungus attaches to the plant roots dramatically increasing the roots ability to absorb water and exchange cations. In exchange, the plant provides the fungus a little feeding of its own internal sugar production. A win-win relationship. And I do, by the way, purchase mychhriza spores from mushroom suppliers, just for this purpose, to innoculate my soil.

    Now the really, really bad news is that applying any form of sugar to the soil is like putting up a large freeway "Dennys" sign for all the other undesirable microorganisms in the soil...attracting them to the region around your plant. If you are using sterile media for soil, you will get some respite, but many of these undesirable microorganisms create airborne spores.

    Okay, I'm really rambling here. So my personal conclusion is that, at best, this is an expensive way of ammending the soil, that can be done better the old fashioned way with NPK and micronutrients. At the same time, you may be setting up the soil as an enhanced breeding ground for undesirable microorganisms. And finally, you are negating the reason for the beneficial microorganisms [mycorrhiza] to be there in the first place.

    Doesn't seem like a very good deal to me.

    PG

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  7. Osprey Solid.

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    Hey, appreciate that.
  8. pastor420 Ever learning

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    Molasses has been used for many years in the agricultural community as a soil amendment. Some use it in dry form, others in liquid but the bottom line is that it is a big plus for your plant. Besides feeding the beneficial microbes in your soil it provides carbohydrates for the plant. Some growers are using Botanicare's Sweet or AN's Sweet Leaf though being a little cheap I prefer just the plain old blackstrap molasses.
  9. passionate_grower Experienced Stoner

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    Yes, that's right. you'll get hundreds of hits by googling on the benefits of molasses as a soil ammendment. Its benefits are anecdotal and numerous. However, I could not find a peer-reviewed study on the use of molasses.

    I still would never consider it for the reasons stated:

    1) You can get higher NPK from cheaper fertilizer,
    2) Plants don't need carbs in the soil, it is contrary to their metabolism,
    3) It does not enhance the beneficial myccorhizae symbiotic relationship

    But I have family members that swear by planting on lunar cycles. So, this is just me, but I put the molasses thing in the same folklore bucket with lunar cycle planting.

    But, hey, if it works for some folks, I'm not goin to stop them.

    PG

  10. Indica420 Part time viking

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    I Tried It Once And Had Ants Infest My Pots So I Don't Know.But I Do Agree With The whole Lunar Cycle Thing I've Got A Moonchart And It Tells You Best Time To Plant Clone And Germinate And When Not 2 Grow Or Transplant.I Grew When It Said Not To Grow And All Me Seedlings Died And Thats The Only Time Thats Happen To Me Out 4-5 Years Growing.

    Peace Out
  11. 420HeidiXx Veteran Stoner

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    Pretty Interesting.
  12. pastor420 Ever learning

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    Yes, as an amendment. Much as you would add lime to a peat based mix or castings to your all organic grow. Your not replacing your ferts, but merely adding to them. There is an old saying that you feed the soil and not the plant. Aside from the micronutes available from the Blackstrap, you do build the beneficial microbal activity in the soil. Plants by the way, as do any living organisms, use carbohydrates.

    As far as lunar cycles go you are dismissing the literal tons of agricultural evidence contrary to your opinion. Sure, it is merely empirical evidence but since that evidence is what we eat, smoke and wear I think it bears up.

    This is just my observations over the years and it sure isn't meant to be personal. Peace.:family:
  13. passionate_grower Experienced Stoner

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    Again, any peer-reviewed study or data?

    I have read a number of studies over the years on efforts to improve the microfloral balance of the soil, either crop-specific or for recovery of damaged forests, and pollution remediation. I have not seen a study that supported the additon of any form of complex/simple sugar nor carbohydrate to the soil. The most widely accepted method for enhancing microflora in the soil to date, is to innoculate the soil with specific strains of beneficial fungi.

    Yes, plants require carbohydrates....but they produce their own vis-a-vis photosynthesis. The only time we intentionally introduce, for example, sucrose is in the case of micropropagation, where we are propagating plants in an unnatural, in vitro environment, propagating at the cellular level.

    Lunar planting.....no offense, but I still find this to be a modern flat-earth-like belief. I think it is sort of horticultural astrology. Again, if you can point me to any sort of controlled- study, I would be fascinated to learn otherwise.

    Thanks,

    PG

  14. cani fluffy? Priceless...

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    all this lunar planting reminds me of the Old Farmers Almanac
    i have no experience with it tho, anybody else?
  15. mazarxnl Ron Paul 2012

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    where can i get a moon chart?
  16. cani fluffy? Priceless...

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    i also used molasses last time, but i think it messed with my ability to determine if the triches were ready, maybe all the dark color from the molasses added color to the triches so it looked like they were amber already... no idea...


    :confused:

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